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“I’m relieved I hadn’t met up with him or told him identifying information about myself.”As strange as her experience felt, Tweten realized after swapping stories with friends that it wasn’t that unusual: For many women, oddly aggressive, sometimes threatening interactions with men are an all-too-familiar feature of Internet dating.

Women were asked to look at a trio of sketches of men in various settings, and to say where they’d prefer to find their ideal man: in camp chopping wood, in a studio painting a canvas, or in a garage working a pillar drill. 1400 Series computer, which then spit out your matches: five blue cards, if you were a woman, or five pink ones, if you were a man.

Men were asked to rank drawings of women’s hair styles: a back-combed updo, a Patty Duke bob.

The website for Phoenix Singles says it has the most highly qualified relationship singles in the area.

That promising statement, along with the company's salespeople, got Gray's attention."Everyone came to the door, 'Oh my gosh, you're so beautiful. We have so many men in the database that fits your criteria, and look at you, my gosh why don't you already have someone?

The Sun City woman divorced six years ago and spends her time hanging out with friends and staying fit by doing yoga.

As far as dating is concerned, she turned to a Scottsdale company called Phoenix Singles in hopes of finding a man she could spend time with."They assured me that had men in their database that fit the criteria that I was looking for," Gray said.

They’d heard about some students at Harvard who’d come up with a program called Operation Match, which used a computer to find dates for people. She makes Quiche Lorraine, plays chess, and like me she loves to ski. ”One day, a woman named Patricia Lahrmer, from 1010 WINS, a local radio station, came to to do an interview.

A year later, Altfest and Ross had a prototype, which they called Project , an acronym for Technical Automated Compatibility Testing—New York City’s first computer-dating service. She was the station’s first female reporter, and she had chosen, as her début feature, a three-part story on how New York couples meet.

Each client paid five dollars and answered more than a hundred multiple-choice questions. (A previous installment had been about a singles bar—Maxwell’s Plum, on the Upper East Side, one of the first that so-called “respectable” single women could patronize on their own.) She had planned to interview Altfest, but he was out of the office, and she ended up talking to Ross.

One section asked subjects to choose from a list of “dislikes”: “1. The batteries died on her tape recorder, so they made a date to finish the interview later that week, which turned into dinner for two.

And this starts with knowing how to go on first dates.